UKRAINIAN LOCAL GOVERNMENT AND COUNCIL OF EUROPE’S STANDARDS: HUMAN RIGHTS PROTECTION AND DECENTRALISATION AT THE TIMES OF MILITARISATION

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Published: Nov 17, 2023

  Vitalii Barvinenko

  Natalia Mishyna

  Ceyhun Qaracayev

Abstract

The subject of the study is the relationship between Ukrainian local government structures, municipal standards set by the Council of Europe, and their intersection with human rights and decentralisation policies, especially in the context of ongoing militarisation in certain regions of Ukraine. The study aims to analyse how these elements interact and influence each other in the Ukrainian governance system, exploring the legal, policy and practical aspects of this complex interaction. Methodology. The methodology of a study involves a combination of research methods and approaches in order to comprehensively investigate the subject matter. In addition to the legal analysis, the authors presented the results of the document analysis. Also, because the Ukrainian decentralisation reform has had a major impact on most spheres of local life, the authors have chosen an interdisciplinary approach: given the complexity of the issue, this approach helps to incorporate elements of law, economics and international relations to provide a holistic understanding of the issues at hand. The results of the study showed that: a) the Council of Europe currently lacks human rights standards that are integrated with its municipal standards. This is a significant gap that could be strategically addressed, given the potential of local government bodies in the field of human rights protection; b) Ukraine would benefit from the development of a comprehensive framework outlining actions to be taken by local government bodies to protect human rights and facilitate the implementation of European Court of Human Rights judgments. Despite the pervasive effects of militarisation throughout the country, post-conflict reconstruction will require the continuation of these policies. This is particularly important as Ukraine seeks to rebuild the nation and resume the reforms that were underway before the outbreak of conflict, including municipal reform with a focus on financial decentralisation and reform of the implementation of ECHR judgments. Conclusion. In summary, militarisation in certain regions of Ukraine has created a number of complex challenges for local governments, affecting security, governance, human rights and social services. The protracted nature of the conflict has made it even more difficult to address these issues. Finding sustainable solutions to these challenges requires a coordinated effort involving local authorities, the national government, international organisations and civil society to promote stability, protect human rights and rebuild affected communities.

How to Cite

Barvinenko, V., Mishyna, N., & Qaracayev, C. (2023). UKRAINIAN LOCAL GOVERNMENT AND COUNCIL OF EUROPE’S STANDARDS: HUMAN RIGHTS PROTECTION AND DECENTRALISATION AT THE TIMES OF MILITARISATION. Baltic Journal of Economic Studies, 9(4), 31-36. https://doi.org/10.30525/2256-0742/2023-9-4-31-36
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Keywords

local governance, municipal governance, local self-government, decentralisation, financial decentralisation, militarisation, Council of Europe standards, human rights

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